Diggen Attends the Small Business Web Summit

As an entrepreneur, my time is limited and divided between many tasks. Making the time to attend conferences, let alone choosing which conferences to attend is a daunting task. My good friend Dina Moskowitz, the founder of SaaSMax, told me about the Small Business Web Summit and their organization where she is also a board member. I knew this was one conference I couldn’t miss primarily for two reasons.

First, our missions were aligned, since the Small Business Web Organization and Summit’s mission is to help small businesses with technology. At Diggen we believe access to data shouldn’t be complicated, nor expensive. We are building a platform allowing any size business the ability to source and integrate marketing data, so businesses can better understand their audience and leverage the data to improve their marketing initiatives.

Second, the right people were attending. If you’re speaking to the wrong audience, it doesn’t matter how great your mission statement sounds. Before attending any conference, it’s good to know who else will be flying in. Conferences are the ideal way to connect with many individuals you would normally spend weeks trying to reach. When doing my conference due diligence, I discovered many of the companies on my target list were attending, but also the right person to connect and discuss opportunities. It was a blend of technology startups and large software companies, but the people were the Founders, CEOs, Heads of Partnerships, Alliances, and Product.

So I booked my trip to the Bay Area and off I went!

Evening Before The Summit

I arrived earlier than expected and was excited to make the pre-conference dinner scheduled for attendees. It was held at the Tied House in Mountain View and I was very pleased with the evening.

It was a long table with about 15 people and it immediately felt like a group of coworkers getting together after work. My end of the table was Josh Sanderson from Lightspeed Capital, Alex Fong from Microsoft, and Sunir Shah from Olark. Josh and I instantly hit it off and connected over our GE background.  Apparently he was involved in the proposal to acquire GE Information Service at the exact time I was a program manager there.

After eating my dinner, drinking some cider, and chatting with this side of the table, I moved over to the other side to meet more attendees. Ironically, I recognized Mike Montano from ReviewBuzz, since we were on the same flight from San Diego and we were also in the same Uber riding sharing from the airport.

After an hour, Sunir moved over to this side of the table and I got a chance to talk in more detail with him. He asked me very specific questions about my business and seemed fascinated with the overall challenges of SaaS companies to grow. In addition, Sunir is a board member of the Summit and he also MC most of the Summit. We discussed running an event and creative approaches to increase ticket sales since I am on the board of Startup San Diego and we run San Diego Startup Week coming up in June.

Summit Day 1

The conference was hosted at the Google Quad Campus. Armies of dedicated engineers trotted all around and I couldn’t help but feel like I was in a surreal science fiction film. I’m familiar with the Googleplex main campus since they were a partner at the last company and I visited every so often. However, it was amazing to visit yet another Google campus just a mile away.

I attended the track format sessions in the afternoon with Anand Kulkarni from Lead Genius and Chris Campbell from Review Tracker, and Jon Ferrara from Nimble as speakers. All were informative and entertaining presentations, which were also relevant to my business. When I connected with Anand and Chris afterward at happy hour, we chatted about our mutual background in local search. They were familiar with my former company Localeze. It really is a small world in the data industry!

I finally got to connect in person with Lou Salfi and Hannah Shain from Cloud Elements.  After many phone conversations, it was a pleasure to put faces to the names and voices. Cloud Elements is a company I found researching potential partners to integrate as a key component of our platform, so I’m excited to integrate in the future as part of our offering.

I ended day 1 with meeting Cody Jones from Zapier. Zapier is another integration for Diggen, since we make it easier for Zapier’s customers to source marketing data into their ecosystem. Cody is just establishing the business development initiatives at Zapier and we are excited to watch their fast pace growth!

The night ended with another brewery event  at Steins Beer Garden in Mountain View sponsored by Microsoft. It’s nice to see the micro brewery scene booming in other California cities! San Diego still holds the title of the most microbreweries, so let me know if you come visit and need a tour guide.

The two people that stood out in my research in deciding to attend the Summit were Richard Gilbert from Infusionsoft and Pamela O’Hara from Batchbooks. Not only are they board members of the Summit and focused on software for small business, but I was also interested in sharing Diggen’s embedded service for CRM platforms and get their thoughts.

Summit Day 2

The beginning of the day was focused on speakers, which were statistically and number driven. Started with Dawn Poulos from Mattermark. I follow the founder Danielle Morrill online, so it was nice to hear a bit of their story. Dina Moskowitz from SaaSMAX had a panel next to discuss the missed opportunity and value of building a reseller program to grow your software business. SaaSMAX is a growth engine for SaaS companies and their resellers, so it was an interesting discussion to identify a viable growth channel.

Last speaker before lunch was Tomasz Tunguz from Redpoint and I also follow him online, since we have similar backgrounds as mechanical engineers and entrepreneurs. I was the first person to welcome him when he walked in, so I got the opportunity to chat with him. Always great to talk with a former founder and current investor in your space.

Rarely do you attend a conference and you look forward to the food. However, the Google campus will spoil you and yet another reason employees are hooked. Being gluten free, I’ve been spoiled with the health conscious options in San Diego, so I want to take a moment to thank Christina Hug from The Makers Nation. She also manages the Summit and it was thoughtful of her to request from the Google Chefs gluten free options for meals.

Both days in the afternoon were structured as separate group conversations to have interactive sessions around a specific topic. It was called “Birds of a Feather” and it was a new format being tested by the Summit. Personally, I liked the idea and I hope it continues to develop. I also greatly appreciate when organizers listen to their customer’s feedback from previous events and adapt to continually improve the value.

Later I attended a growth session with Vasil Azarov from StartupSocials since we had talked many times before based on our passion for helping startup founders to grow their business. He was interviewing Zach Onisko from Hired and my friend Neal Bloom is launching the San Diego business for Hired.

The last session was from Bob Ogdon from Swiftpage and Sam Laber from Datanyze. I was entertained listening to Bob since I remember the history of Act! And using the shrink wrap software years ago. It’s rare for a company to continue to innovate, especially with the transition to the cloud. I had already chatted with Sam and their goals at Datanyze, so it was nice to check out his presentation about marketing technology and analytics supporting their growth success.

The Summit ended in a happy hour outside with plenty of drinks. In fact I was literally the only person left and it was entertaining to observe random people walk by. They would walk back, check out the table, and then load up their arms with bottles of wine and beer. The employment incentives from Google will hinder innovation for the rest of us.

In Summary

From the facility to the amenities, the attendees, and food, the organizers did an absolutely amazing job! What I enjoyed most, was it wasn’t a typical mass appeal event, but much more targeted. I felt that I was able to harness the full value of connecting with others at a conference by making genuine business relationships that will ultimately focus in on helping each other grow. I felt more like a group of friends in the same industry getting together and welcoming the opportunity to figure out whether we could collaborate. I was surprised to learn the conference is 7 years old and I can’t wait to be part of it again next year. Or possibly attend the east coast version when visiting my hometown!

Buzz, Buzz, Buzz! Marketing Technology Terminology Explained

With so many new tech terms floating around these days, it can be hard to keep up with what’s going on in the tech world. With big data and cloud computing becoming so pervasive, it’s more important than ever to stay on the up and up with new terminology. Here’s a breakdown of some of the buzzwords you’re bound to encounter from general to more specific technology needs in data..

SaaS

SaaS (Software as a Service) is the biggest market in cloud computing and is growing at the fastest rate. This type of service uses the Web to deliver applications, but the apps are managed by a third-party vendor. Then, you access this party’s interface on your own side, but the apps don’t need to be installed and run on individual computers, which is why it’s so convenient and appealing to users. Remember when you actually had to buy shrink wrap software, install it, maintain it, and upgrade it to the new versions? Examples of this are apps from Google, Salesforce and Cisco WebEx.

PaaS

PaaS (Platform as a Service) is used for apps and other types of development while providing cloud components to software. It’s a service that offers developers different hooks and tools to develop the platform. Microsoft Windows Azure is an example of this type of platform–it gives you tools to develop mobile apps, social apps, websites, games and more. You build them on your own but the APIs hook them into Azure and run them through the platform.

IaaS

IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service) is a self-service model that allows you to access, monitor and manage remote data center infrastructures. A system like this negates the need to purchase hardware because you can access it all remotely through the cloud. Users have an infrastructure on top of which they can install any required platform. Amazon Web Services and Google Compute Engine are examples.

iPaaS

iPaas (Integration Platform as a Service) is a cloud-based integration solution. It’s a platform for building and deploying integration within the cloud and between the cloud and enterprise. Users can develop integration flows that connect apps that live in the cloud or locally and deploy them without having to install or manage hardware. This is still in its early stages and will likely be built out further.

DaaS

Data as a Service!

Don’t get overwhelmed yet–we’re not quite done! DaaS (Data as a Service) is a cousin of SaaS because it’s the information that’s delivered on-demand through the software. Data equates to deep insights, and the more we know the better decisions we can make! Between consumer data, operational data, and more- the more we understand how our day-to-day business works, the better prepared we are for future growth and scale!

MDM

MDM (Master Data Management) is a method of letting an enterprise link all of its critical data to one master database in order to have a common point of reference. It helps you be more consistent about reporting and regulatory compliance. You decide for yourself what information is considered master data and then use a software to manage it all in one place. Also minimizes future projects, since necessary data is readily available to integrate into future systems.

ESB

ESB (Enterprise Service Bus) is a software architecture model that is used to design and implement communication between mutually interacting software apps. All of this occurs in a service-oriented architecture (SOA). It’s helpful to think of an ESB as a mechanism that manages access to apps and services via a single, simple interface for the end users. IBM states that ESB is not a new product per se. Rather, it’s a new way of looking at how to integrate apps and coordinate resources.

EAI

EAI (Enterprise Application Integration) refers to the plans, methods and tools that help to modernize and coordinate computer applications. The enterprise can keep using their existing apps and databases and add new apps and technology without disrupting service. It involves coming up with new ways to reuse what you already have and add additional apps and data.

 

Good Start On Terminology

Anything you think should be included to make a more comprehensive list? Wondering how it applies to your enterprise?

http://searchvirtualdesktop.techtarget.com/definition/desktop-as-a-service-DaaS

https://www.mulesoft.com/resources/cloudhub/what-is-ipaas-gartner-provides-reference-model

http://www.networkworld.com/article/2182527/virtualization/iaas-vs–paas-vs–saas.html

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb190163.aspx

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enterprise_service_bus

http://searchsoa.techtarget.com/definition/enterprise-service-bus

http://searchsoa.techtarget.com/definition/EAI

The Modern Customer Funnel

Originally, businesses created a traditional sales funnel where the company was in control and got to push the prospect through the sales grinder. That original model is dead now that a new model has emerged. The main difference in the new model is that instead of businesses working toward a “close,” both customers and businesses alike are starting to see the funnel as the beginning of a deep and valuable relationship with each other. The new model was coined Pirate Metrics by Dave McClure because of its infamous acronym: AARRR! This stands for the five key metrics that McClure believes map out the lifecycle of the customer: Acquisition, Activation, Retention, Referral and Revenue.

AIDA vs. AARRR

The original AIDA model has been around in the marketing world for ages. The lifecycle went like this:

A is for Awareness, or attracting the customers’ attention.

I is for getting the Interest of the customer.

D is for getting the customer to Desire your product and convincing them it will satisfy their needs.

A is for Action, which is leading customers toward the actual purchase.

While its principles still have some value, it is now pretty out of date. The main difference between AIDA and AARRR is that McClure’s followers start with acquisition of customers instead of Awareness building, according to Sean Ellis. From there, it goes on to extend the life of the client-relationship with the retention phase.

Data Driven Analysis and The Funnel

Consumers don’t follow a linear path through the funnel any longer. Much of the journey relies on digital engagement. For instance, consumers often check out product reviews on websites and across platforms, look at their social media accounts and then make purchases online. All of this information is tracked and available for us to analyze. The split-funnel attribution model takes advantage of this data-driven insight into how each part of the funnel boosts conversions by tracking impressions, clicks and conversion info. In turn, this data-driven analysis helps you to create more personalized content that drives acquisitions, leads and revenue as well.

The Acquisition Phase

In the new marketing funnel, you place a lot of emphasis on your first contact point with your customer. Your initial marketing efforts worked and you have their attention. They’ve probably visited your website and some of them have even taken an interest in your content. These numbers serve as the starting point for analyzing which of your marketing channels are working. You can see which types of content are holding people on your site and which ones are trickling down and out. Breaking this into stages helps, such as who signed up for your mailing list, who signed up for your Beta list and how long their engagement with certain aspects of your site was. The ones who are subscribing are the ones in an advanced stage of acquisition – these are the ones you want to push forward with your Activation steps.

Retention Phase

In today’s connected world, the conversation doesn’t end when the sale is ‘closed’. For example, Halloween is confined to sales during September and October. However, the conversation doesn’t abruptly stop after the 31st. Technology allows for companies to have a continuous conversation with customers, make them continuously feel appreciated, and increase their lifetime value as a customer.

Traditionally, it was hard to monitor when customers were talking about a brand and required more resources to focus on retention vs. customer acquisition. In the modern era, we have technology such as Oracle’s new image recognition software designed for brands to ‘listen’ for when customer post photos including recognizable brand attributes. These tools make it easier to focus on increasing the lifetime value of customers through engagement with the intention of increasing their individual net promoter score as well.

 

Sources

https://www.ensighten.com/company/newsroom/lets-split-funnel/

https://www.convertwithcontent.com/the-content-marketing-sales-funnel/

https://twitter.com/seanellis/status/629699744097439745

http://www.samuelhulick.com/life-inside-dave-mcclures-pirate-metrics-funnel/

UX Marketing Competitive Advantage

Developing a user experience without consumer data is like trying to diagnose a patient without an examination. Gone are the simple days where marketing could push messaging to consumers with little insight into their responses. In today’s digital world, marketing has morphed into brand interactions and creating brand experiences. UX plays a significant role in the flow of communication, and luring consumers to engage in a buyer journey.

UX and flow of communication

Every interaction between mobile devices, is done through the flow of communication with data. The healthcare sector is the best example for us to breakdown to explain how strong UX is needed to improve systems, continue to collect data, and personalize!

The current challenge

Healthcare is enriched with data and many looming industries that would benefit from it. The challenge is that most of the data collected stays stagnant, and therefore keeps innovation in technology for healthcare stagnant as well. UX can help solve this problem by creating an intuitive and easy flow of data between primary physicians, public health sectors, and other adjacent industries that might benefit from the merging of data.

The solution

“One of the simplest things people want is intimacy with applications,” says Debra Lilley, vice president of cloud services at Certus Solutions. While this is a great quote, it’s not a simple one. Like a medical diagnosis, creating an individualized intimate user experience, has a brevity of variables and considerations; culture, environment, traditions, personal tastes, personalities are all influences on a potential UX strategy.

UX and the competitive advantage

Since healthcare is extremely slow to innovate, it’s creating huge opportunity for startups to enter the market and disrupt the industry:  “Oscar is a health insurance startup that hopes to change the way that people buy and interact with their health care coverage by using technology paired with simple and intuitive design”, Gigaom. Oscar’s competitive advantage is leveraging simple user interface, to make the flow of information and establish connections between providers, physicians and the user. This experience is vastly different from the headache of calling providers, and relying on outdated technology that’s inefficient.

By now you’re probably wondering what’s the tie-in to consumer data? Well, we are consumers of healthcare. Consumer data when it comes to healthcare, can help companies know when you moved, and recommend providers based on where you are now instead of where you were. Consumer data can help marketers know when it might be allergy season and to notify you that you might want to stock up on allergy medication because you’re sensitive to pollen. Consumer data can tell us a lot.

References:

https://www.enterpriseirregulars.com/102419/business-software-trends-update/

http://www.forbes.com/sites/oracle/2015/10/05/3-tech-must-dos-for-a-smoother-user-experience/

http://www.business2community.com/marketing/5-marketing-trends-you-should-be-tapping-01346271

http://globenewswire.com/news-release/2015/10/06/773908/10151831/en/Closing-the-Data-Divide.html  

https://gigaom.com/2015/09/16/why-google-is-taking-a-closer-look-at-disrupting-health-care/

 

Personalization is The New Nirvana

Digital marketing, such as advertisements, we see are like works of art. Creative directors are tasked with composing a variety of elements from realism to sound composition, to developing an advertisement that will grab your attention, keeping your interest, instilling desire, and demanding action. The difference between art and advertising, is art is meant to be enjoyable, whereas an advertisement is meant to fulfill a monetary purpose. In today’s digital world, creating advertisements can get even more complex, such as adding in a layer of augmented reality, that will engulf the targeted customer into an entire experience. The problem creative directors have, is to build multiple works of art that will appeal to a variety of different personalities to drive the same end goal.

Using Data to Develop Marketing Content

True personalization is creating a group segment audience of 1. This is also known as ‘nirvana’. The challenge that presents itself here is that no two individuals are alike. Even the most extreme identical twins have a small degree of variation in their personalities. I want to talk about a concept that I like to call ‘Deep Data’. I want to differentiate this from Big Data, because I think Deep Data as a descriptor to determine a person’s psyche.

There are plenty of Big Data sources available to help creative directors build ads based on high-level segmentation. Understanding demographics, can help creative directors determine basic cultural differences, and develop advertisements that will fit in various markets. Where it starts to become tricky, is gathering the deep data sources. It’s much easier to figure out where someone lives vs. the emotional intelligence of that individual. The other challenge, is most people are willing to give up demographical information, but any info that would be seen as compromising to the person is much harder to attain.

This is where digital trust is crucial if we want to progress towards true personalization.

Gathering Deep Data

Between beacons, IP addresses, learning algorithms, cookies and surveys there are plenty of strategic ways to gather information about a person. The problem, is all this data gets collected and stored in various systems and there isn’t a current solution that combines them all into one. The other issue presented here, is tracking the success of individual campaigns. There are ways to track open rates, impressions, click through’s and conversions, but what this data doesn’t tell you, is why an ad didn’t work with those that didn’t convert, and why it worked with those that did.

As we move towards Nirvana, creative directors and marketers will need to be able to understand each individual and know exactly which mixtures of messages and content will create the efficacy that every business wants without losing the consumer’s trust.

References:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/sap/2015/07/11/marketing-nirvana-engaging-with-an-audience-of-one/

http://searchcontentmanagement.techtarget.com/feature/Location-data-adds-context-for-Web-personalization

http://www.forbes.com/sites/johnrampton/2015/09/03/better-data-enables-better-customer-segmentation/

http://www.martechadvisor.com/marketing-analytics/clickagy-launches-data-driven-content-providing-intelligent-on-page-optimization-using-audience-profiles/

http://www.dtcperspectives.com/getting-to-the-how-unlocking-identification-personalization-and-the-regulatory-landscape/

Crossing the Data Driven Chasm

George Orwell in his book 1984, depicts a society that is overseen by Big Brother. Big Brother in this case, was the government. The Government, utilizing a series of various video monitoring services, were able to control societies every move. Now while 1984 is a tale of fiction, there is some truth to what he wrote. We are entering an era of information overload so companies can create individualized experiences and build one-on-one relationships.  

The Chasm

Chasm, by traditional definition, is a deep fissure in the earth, ie. a canyon, gorge or abyss. In Geoffrey Moore’s book “Crossing The Chasm” he refers to the pivotal moment in which high-tech companies cross the marketing chasm from early adopters to widespread adoption.  

Crossing The Data Chasm

Creating the ToolKit

You wouldn’t cross the grand canyon without the appropriate tools, so why try to develop one-on-one marketing without the proper data sets? Currently on the market, there are various resources that when coupled together get you further to crossing the chasm. For example, pairing implicit data sets from Acxiom with explicit data sets from Keen.io will help you profile your audience while analyzing what they visit most on your website to better understand their interests. However, these sets together, will only get you so far and you’ll probably still fall into the chasm at some point. What this data doesn’t currently do, is offer the ability to import into a SaaS marketing technology like Salesforce, Marketo or Mailchimp, to create individualized profiles. When this can be done, we will be much closer to content personalization and crossing the data driven chasm.

Skills Needed to Cross

Data is useless if marketers don’t understand what it means. If we pack the right tool kit to help us cross the chasm, it won’t mean anything if we can’t figure out where the chasm is that we need to cross. Early adopters that are closer to crossing the chasm are the digital media and technology agencies that are experts in finding the channels, and creating interactive experiences with their audiences. There is a great data divide, however, for smaller businesses to effectively deploy the right toolkits needed to optimize their advertising efforts.

The Data Chasm continues to grow deeper as more data than ever before is being collected through sensors, wearables, tracking and more.The race to cross the chasm has begun, and what we will see happen is the puzzle pieces come together to create the perfect toolkit.  

References:

http://businessvalueexchange.com/blog/2015/07/09/open-data-drives-us-towards-the-information-chasm/

http://exelate.com/resources/news/new-iab-study-reveals-data-divide-early-adopters-leverage-cutting-edge-opportunities-in-marketing-data-but-barriers-remain-to-broader-use-of-new-practices/

https://gigaom.com/2014/05/06/5-technologies-that-will-help-big-data-cross-the-chasm/

It’s Getting Personal

I’ve been reading many articles on data personalization as it relates to content marketing and I keep arriving at the same conclusion – It’s all about the story. But what story are we actually telling? A person doesn’t just have one story, they have multiple stories. Trying to reach someone when they want to be reached can get tricky. Are we appealing to them when they are working? Or do we try to reach them at home? These are questions data is hoping to help answer.

The B2B Story

You arrive at the office and you’re immediately bombarded with emails that never seem to end. You get called into your morning meetings where someone in the room is trying to ‘sell’ something – an idea, a campaign, a new tool that the company should buy, etc… Before you know it, it’s time for lunch. While at lunch you login to Linkedin and you’re flooded with even more ads – new job offerings, new services, new startups, etc…

Remember the famous quote: “It’s not personal, it’s just business?” While reading an article on B2B content personalization, the core message became clear; before you waste precious time on that powerpoint, find out how your boss wants information delivered. Marketers are presented with the same challenge. When creating the B2B message – find out exactly how the target audience wants information delivered. This will save you ample amounts of time in delivering the right message at the right time to the right person, because after all… time is money.

The B2C Story

You get off of work, and now you’re just an ordinary consumer faced with an amplified amount of places or things to spend your hard earned money. In our last blog, we talked about the importance of data personalization and why consumers want individualized messages, so it resonates as an emotional and relevant message.

If you aren’t familiar with Simon Sinek, he is famous for his Ted Talk on the ‘What’ vs. ‘Why’. He explains the seduction involved in storytelling and describes the brilliance behind Apple’s marketing messaging. Where Apple has the competitive edge over many businesses from access to their unique data asset. They understand their consumers so well, that their messages dig deep to connect with who they are… because ‘It’s all about me”.

The Differences in Constructing the Story

There are two main differences in B2B and B2C data. B2B data is more quantitative or objective in purpose, so it is typically used for lead generation. B2C data is more qualitative or subjective and help marketers piece together profiles to understand who you are, so there is more of an emotional connection. The ultimate goal in marketing, would be one-on-one, aka. personalization. When constructing these stories, it’s important to remember that people don’t become an entirely different person when they bounce from their B2B to B2C roles. To gather all of these puzzle pieces, it’s either ridiculously expensive or the data sets are very jumbled. The solution would be to have a robust platform enabling marketers the flexibility to select the correct data sources to construct the compelling marketing messages that they can apply to their target audience, at the times in which they would like to be reached.

Data still has a far road ahead for marketers to reach personalization, but we are slowly crossing the chasm to deliver the optimal value for their end customers.

 

Resources:

http://m.bizcommunity.com/Article.aspx?l=196&c=423&i=132915

http://techcrunch.com/2015/08/14/the-future-of-consumer-marketing-is-personal-2/?utm_medium=referral&utm_source=pulsenews

http://www.business2community.com/b2b-marketing/b2b-personalization-is-still-far-from-wash-rinse-repeat-mode-but-you-can-create-the-right-framework-01280978

Data Personalization

Hi- I’m Fabrice, the Founder and CEO of Diggen. I live in Southern California, but grew up on the East Coast. I’m largely passionate about startups, technology, and a big foodie. So why does this information matter? What’s the point of me giving you an inside look into who I am? Simple. Data Personalization.

The Purpose of Personalizing

Do you prefer these black shoes or those blue shoes? Do you want to be bothered in the morning, or in the evening? In my brief description above, you only learned a few things. I didn’t tell you what types of food I like. I didn’t share where in Southern California I live. Since consumers are complex, the software needs to be as equally complex. As a marketer- it’s your goal to create real-time personalized experiences for consumers, without coming off as creepy. Ultimately creating more relevancy for each consumer, so they become more engaged.

The Problem with Personalization

Consumers are complex. Because there are so many facets to a person, it makes it challenging to know exactly what they are thinking. Our industry has done a horrible job protecting the consumer and establishing digital trust. As a result, consumers are reluctant to release anything about themselves and we, the marketers, end up spending a ton of money on AB testing just to figure out what messages and imagery appeal to different people to create that real-time personalized experience.

But the problem only begins there! The other current challenge we are faced with, is the expectation by consumers to create a personalized experiences. In the ever evolving digital evolution, consumers are more demanding than ever for personalization but they equally demanding that their information is protected.

While 73% of consumers prefer buying from companies that personalize the shopping experience for convenience, 94% are concerned about data privacy and how companies use their data. While these statistics seem conflicting, there are methods to deliver a balance of relevancy and privacy to consumers. “Marketers shouldn’t have to select between relevancy OR privacy, but rather relevancy AND privacy.”

So what’s a marketer to do?

Tweet Quote: “Marketers shouldn’t have to select between relevancy OR privacy, but rather, relevancy AND privacy”

 

Diggen is the middleware. Think of it as the relationship coach in a really bad tug-of-war between partners. Marketers are using more tools and technology to help tailor the experience for customers, but in order to tailor those experiences they need data. There are many data providers out there focused on collecting the data but aren’t necessarily concerned with how the data is being used (which then causes mistrust from the customer). Diggen is the middleman by securely brokering the deal between data providers and the applications using the data. Diggen provides the security customers want, while vetting the data that CRM tools actually need which will then allow businesses to create the personalized marketing experiences that matter.

 

Sources:

http://www.fluiddrivemedia.com/advertising/marketing-messages/

http://www.emarketer.com/Article/Marketers-Stuck-on-Basic-Data-Personalization/1012763

http://www.dmnews.com/marketing-strategy/drizly-chugs-down-data-to-drive-personalization/article/428643/

http://venturebeat.com/2015/07/22/80-of-consumers-have-updated-their-privacy-settings-and-other-barriers-to-personalization/

http://insight.venturebeat.com/state-of-marketing-technology-hyper-personalization?utm_source=vb&utm_medium=refer&utm_content=editorial-post&utm_campaign=somt-personalization-report

http://insight.venturebeat.com/state-of-marketing-technology-hyper-personalization?utm_source=vb&utm_medium=refer&utm_content=editorial-post&utm_campaign=somt-personalization-report

http://0ca36445185fb449d582-f6ffa6baf5dd4144ff990b4132ba0c4d.r41.cf1.rackcdn.com/Make%20It%20Personalized.jpg

https://uploads.www.gigya.com/2015/07/16143453/Gigya_Infographic_2015PrivacyPersonalization.jpg